Jordan Peterson, Do You See What I See?

What does the number of times Hitler bathed in a day have to do with the Coronavirus lockdowns?

On the surface, it might seem like the the two have nothing to do with each other, but the connection between slowing infection and manufactured disgust is nothing new, as explored in the following video.

By the way, this video actually predates the coronavirus lockdowns, which makes its contents all the more jarring:

It is a very human tendency to bring order to chaos, as leaders are expected to do. But an over-emphasis on order brings with it the risk of crossing the civilizational rubicon into madness.

Such was the case with Adolf Hitler, who initially combatted infection, not through an abundance of fear, but with a perception of civility.

That same perceived civility resulted in a sense of manufactured disgust in those who were not as “pure” or “uninfected”, and the better judgement of the Germans was overridden by a desire to further their leader’s vision of purity.

Hitler’s intention was to completely reorder society, perceiving himself as an intellectual superior who knew what was best for people, more so than the people themselves.

Sound familiar?

Twitter Infograph Warns Asian Art Communities

What you’re seeing above is an infographic uploaded to Twitter by an art-oriented account, intended for Japanese artists who may be seeing a sudden surge in western viewers who are intent on influencing Japanese art, particularly anything done in the manga or anime style.

This infographic comes at a time in which a nebulous affiliation of self-styled influencers are inserting themselves into art communities, intent on ensuring that anything that an artist expresses conforms to their sensibilities.

This can be jarring to Asian artists, who come from a career-oriented culture, who are now finding out that there are western subcultures that take entertainment media so seriously that they allow it to become a part of their identity while contributing little else to society.

The infographic comes in handy for Asians who may not be familiar with certain western subversive movements, and therefore may be less prepared to identify them when such bad actors appear. Whether we call them “intersectionalists” or simply “incels”, this group of people contribute nothing to society, but regardless are characterized by a legendary sense of entitlement, and it’s helpful to understand how to respond to them appropriately.

What I find particularly fascinating is the list of identifiers for the influencers, in that they are mostly accurate. Among them are preferred pronouns, imaginary gender identification, abuse of emojis, or identifying with certain activist groups (a dead giveaway). Also interesting is that they openly identify themselves with their mental illnesses. While one shouldn’t have anything against someone who has a legitimate condition, there are those among us who misuse these identifications for sympathy.

The infographic makes an important point: the way you deal with these people is by ignoring them, or by blocking them, if need be. It is important that one must never cave in to their demands, because they will interpret it as a sign of weakness to latch onto, as the tendency of predators often is.

In spite of their intimidation tactics, the influencers have no real authority, and are in no position to police anyone’s works of artistic expression. Thus, their threats carry no real weight.

One thing that the influencers seem to overlook is that in most of the western world, works of art are protected by freedom of expression, which is encompassing in its application. Even if a work of art is not considered socially acceptable, it is still protected under the freedom of expression. In fact, freedom of expression doesn’t have much value if it doesn’t protect art that isn’t socially acceptable.

Even understanding all this, the typical Japanese person may see the intersectional movement, and be distressed at the fact that so many young people in the west seem stunted and out-of-touch with reality, even years out of school. This highlights the difference in Asian culture, as compared to the west. The fact is, Asian society heavily emphasizes an education that prepares students for a career, reinforced by close-knit families that are highly supportive. It’s hard to imagine that in such an environment, a person would somehow become a cross-dressing ANTIFA windbag that blames all their problems on white-supremacists.

Westen families, generally speaking, could learn a lot from Asian families.

In the face of waves of leftist negativity, among the finest things we can do for Asian artists is let them know that they are appreciated.

There’s something to be said for the culture that brought us Chiyo-chan.

Amazon is Going After Anime Figures Again, and it STILL Makes No Sense

Amazon is back to banning anime figures on the reasoning that they “promote child exploitation or depict children or characters resembling children in a sexually suggestive manner”. An example of a figure that was banned was one of Konata Izumi (pictured above), doing neither of these things.

It seems they really didn’t learn anything, at all.

The characters depicted did nothing besides just standing there, fully clothed, doing nothing especially sexual. They were no more sexualized than any action figure you’d buy for your 10-year-old kid.

They even started going after Nendoroids, such as this one:

If they’re going to go after Nendoroids, they can also start going after Precious Moments figures, because they do just as much to “promote child exploitation or depict children or characters resembling children in a sexually suggestive manner”:

Hold on… is that hand holding? That’s a display of affection! Precious Moments is actually doing more to sexualize the characters the brand depicts than Nendoroids! How are the authoritarian moral busybodies not bazooka-crapping their collectively dainty undergarments?

Putting the manufactured nerd rage aside, I suspect that what’s going on is that a seller was targeted by frivolous complaints that weren’t properly vetted. The seller that the action was against was the same one as before, and similar merchandise was targeted.

Even the nature of the complaints was the same, suggesting that the real culprit was some Karen NPC who actually believes that going after anime figures somehow makes the world a better place, and as dimwitted as she is, she knows that something about complaints about child exploitation bypasses peoples’ better judgement. Putting aside that the characters are fictional, and therefore no children are being exploited.

The seller came forward with subsequent complaints, as shown here:

Oh no, they are NOT going after Cirno. They’ve gone too far.

Fan Trailer Shows What the Pokémon Diamond and Pearl Remakes Would Look Like With a Huge Boost in Quality

When the trailer dropped for the upcoming Pokémon remakes, Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl, just about everyone was underwhelmed.

(blank stare)

The Pokémon fandom is pretty awesome, and one among them decided to produce a fan trailer for the upcoming D&P remakes. The result looks like what one might expect from the single highest-grossing intellectual property of all time, if produced by a company so rich that they don’t need to turn to a bank to finance their own projects:

The trailer looks like it’s for a video game that would be worth $60. That’s pretty impressive, considering that it was made within days of the official trailer.

Isn’t it something special that one fan could pull off in days what a team of professional game developers with years of experience did not?

In fact, it makes one wonder why the professionals didn’t even bother. In light of this, I’ve come up with a theory: What if the official trailer for Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl is actually showing us Cyrus’ world?

Cyrus (pictured above) is the antagonist of the original Sinnoh games. His ambition was to reshape the universe to eliminate concepts like human emotion, which he viewed to be flawed and incomplete.

In Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, Giovanni formed a group called Team Rainbow Rocket, which was composed of leaders from other teams which were taken from grimdark parallel universes where those team leaders actually succeeded.

If the official trailer for Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl showed us what the world would look like if Cyrus succeeded, it would go a long way in explaining why the humans in that interpretation of the Sinnoh games look so unimaginative and unexpressive.

(blank stare)

Somewhere out there, someone let their save file for Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, or Platinum sit for like ten years, without beating Team Galactic. Therefore, Cyrus seized the opportunity to bring his vision of a world of Nendoroids to life.

That’s why you beat your video games, kids.

(halp)

CBS News, Do You See What I See?

As much as I’ve made fun of legacy media, sometimes they publish something that catches my notice, by reason of the fact that it lets on that they really know what’s going on. And in this case, it signals a potential shift in the narrative.

If you were to read the story, you might see it, too. I encourage you to do so. It’s a piece where they acknowledge that there is a pending crisis due to declining birth rates.

Isn’t it interesting how it’s not until after leftists have taken control of nearly every aspect of elected government, in addition to all the institutions they’ve previously infiltrated, that they finally figure this out?

This development is an about-face for the “depopulation movement” (as we’ll colloquially refer to it in this discussion), who in decades past had the idea that there was getting to be too many human beings for this ball of molten rock’s ability to support.

They were so persuaded of this idea that some of them have produced what is referred to as the “Jaffe memo”, which I previously examined here (I found the Jaffe memo here). The memo was produced in 1969 and presented numerous underhanded ways the depopulation movement could surreptitiously reshape society in an effort to slow population growth.

See for yourself:

Obviously, there’s no ethical way to subvert the family plans of millions of people. But for a moment, let it sink in that they actually entertained the idea of “Fertility control agents in water supply”. The 60s had some truly evil people.

Extrapolating from the ideas behind this memo, it’s easy to see why there was as much strength as there has been behind the various movements that actively tampered with the gender dynamic. These very same evil people have infiltrated society on just about every level, and they’ve been hard at work.

Knowing this, consider what it means that legacy media, one of the many, many infiltrated institutions, are acknowledging that birth rates are getting to be way too low, to the point of nearing crisis levels.

Intersectional feminism was one of the many movements that have been propped up, due to the potential damage it could do to the gender dynamic. The same could be said of the LGBTBBQ-silent-f community, and if you don’t also see it, you might be among the many victimized by the narrative, in some way.

The thinking behind propping up gender-aberration was the potential for reducing the replacement rate. But now, there’s a different problem: the replacement rate is getting to be too low. Now that the controllers of the narrative are acknowledging as much, that’s bad news for the various iterations of the gender-aberration movement.

Here is why: Because birth rates have already fallen well below the point of the depopulation movement’s liking, they no longer have a use for the various gender-aberration movements. In fact, those behind the scenes are now taking an interest in reversing the damage that these movements have already caused.

That’s pretty bad news for the gender-aberration movements themselves, considering that they’re about to lose the backing of the various institutions that have previously propped them up. Because they’re now expressing an interest in restoring the population replacement rate, they’d likewise want to prop up what has long been proven to result in a healthy replacement rate: strong masculinity, supportive femininity, traditional family, classical virtues, and a values-based society that focuses on building up each individual, rather than sacrificing individuals to feed the collective.

Sound like wishful thinking? Considering that legacy media is now acknowledging what’s happening, it doesn’t seem terribly unrealistic. When you consider just how much it takes to get legacy media to acknowledge what’s obvious to the rest of us, you can appreciate that this development was a long time coming.

Now the question is, how will those who have been tampering with society pay us all back for the damage that they’ve been causing?

I’m sure that the various victims of cancel culture, as well as everyone who has had relationships wrecked by feminism’s ideas, can think of a long list of demands. But I doubt that Bill Gates and his empire of fake meat will have the means to satisfy them all.

The CBS article made the following observation, and it’s a fun one for the many millennials out there that have been putting up with boomer-bullshit all these years:

“The cost of housing, the cost of education, all these things have become more and more difficult,” Dowell said. “I think the boomers themselves don’t realize how much harder it is for millennials today. And they think, ‘Oh yeah, when we were young we had to live, you know, on very little money, and we made do, and you can do the same.’ That’s the story, right? Well no, it really is a lot harder for young people today. It’s amazing how much harder it is.”

Even though they fancy themselves such great problem-solvers, boomers made fun of millennials with problems for having problems. Now they are paying for their arrogance by not having enough millennials around to pay for their retirement.

“Anyone can make an error, Ensign. But that error doesn’t become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.”

Grand Admiral Thrawn

Why do a live-action reboot of The Powerpuff Girls when you could do a show about aging feminists?

Photo from Variety

I wish I was kidding, but they’re doing a live-action Powerpuff Girls, where Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup are all adult women that look back with regret on their old lives as superheroes.

How depressing can you possibly be?

The Powerpuff Girls hasn’t been reboot as many times as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, but it’s getting to be up there. In addition to the poorly-received 2016 reboot, there has been an anime reboot that originated in Japan, called Demashita: Powerpuff Girls Z:

While the writing was pretty bad, it was still fun to watch, and the character designs weren’t bad. Few people seem to remember the show, which has much to do with the fact that its international release was limited.

In its various reboots, The Powerpuff Girls was intended to be little more than pure stupid fun. If you’re the kind of person who attempts to justify entertainment with its educational value, you weren’t likely to enjoy it (or anything else). There was no edge to it, nor was there depth.

Because of this, a live-action reboot taking place in a future time when the three girls look back on their heroism with regret seems like the worst thing they could do with the series.

Considering this, it got me to thinking. If The CN is up for some depression-porn, is a live-action reboot of grown-up Powerpuff Girls the best way to go about it? What if someone thought of something more depressing?

Then, I got an idea. Here it is: a live-action show about three washed-up feminists in their thirties, called The Sadderpuff Girls!

The one in red is a professional victim who, after spending the prime of her life pursuing her career and threatening discrimination lawsuits to advance, suddenly finds herself desiring to finally settle down and start a family of her own! But she must fight an uphill battle with her own natural hypergamy as she finds that most men haven’t advanced as far in their careers as her! Will she compromise and become a cougar for a younger man? Will she score a knockout before the bell rings on her biological clock? Stay tuned!

The one in blue is an aging THOT who, after a decade of being a cam whore, notices as her view-counts drop by reason of her aging body. The show can follow her zany adventures as she attempts to find a new source of income, in spite of her online reputation, lack of skills, and that huge, massive, gaping hole in her resume! Or, failing that, she can try to find a man to care for her, directly competing with countless twenty-somethings with too much self-respect to pander to simps!

The one in green is a stereotypical butch feminist who, after years of being conditioned by her ideology into assuming the worst in other people, must pick up the scraps of her tattered life in spite of a damaged ability to form interpersonal relationships! Will she recognize her assumptions about other people for the projections that they are, or will she revert to activism in an effort to change everyone but herself? Oh, the suspense!

Antagonists? The Sadderpuff Girls don’t need any antagonists! The Sadderpuff Girls are their own worst enemies!

Is my show idea depressing enough for you? I aim to please.

They’re Making Lola Bunny Less Attractive, and This Was Supposed to Benefit Women, Somehow.

Hold on, what is this? I heard that Lola Bunny is getting a redesign, but that’s just gross. Is that piccie above really of Lola Bunny? She looks like some kind of freaky space-alien-looking-thing.

But that’s not the main thing about her that I’m hearing about. But before this post continues, here’s a short disclaimer:

WARNING: If you’re disturbed by mild sexualization of a cartoon character, you should probably get over yourself.

Now that that’s out of the way, apparently, Lola Bunny was given a breast reduction in an effort to make her less sexually appealing.

In the special way that Slate sees matters, “conservatives want you to be mad that Lola Bunny’s not hot anymore”. This lulzy position overlooks the greater problem that this is what feminism has done to women throughout the western world.

As depicted above, Lola otherwise still has highly feminine characteristics, including diminutive upper-body strength, narrow shoulders, softer eyes, broader hips, and so on. Those hips are quite well-defined, by the way. Those would be what’s referred to as “birther hips”, which are considered strongly appealing by, you know, men. Lola’s otherwise over-the-top feminine appearance makes her breasts all-the-more conspicuous in their absence.

As I see it, the designers of Lola’s character could design her as they wish for what they perceive as the creative benefit of the work that features her. Put another way, if it’s your character, you can design her however you want.

However, if it was the designer’s intention to distract from her sexuality, they’ve likely figured out by now how difficult that can be. In many ways, it couldn’t really be helped by virtue of the fact that sexuality is something that occurs in the mind. An artist can’t really control whether anyone could perceive a work in a sexual manner.

If an artist wanted to make something that was impossible to perceive with an element of sexuality, that in itself would be pretty-much impossible. Humans can perceive a sexual element, even in things that wouldn’t seem intrinsically sexual. Like pizza, which is a food item. I don’t get it, but it’s something that some people find sexual.

What’s more, sexuality is an intrinsic element of humanity. It might even be that sexuality is the most human of traits. The moment that something is humanized (such as, for example, when anthromorphizing a cartoon rabbit), it gains a sexual identity. The only time when it’s acceptable to not consider a sexual identity is when it’s not known, such as when the sex of an unborn child is not yet identified. But once it’s sex is known, it’s not acceptable to call the child an “it” again.

When you draw a cartoon character of your own, and call it a “her”, you’re acknowledging the existence of her vagina, provided that the character is a human female that is anatomically consistent with other human females. It is then assumed that this characteristic plays a role, even if slight, among other characters that they interact with (except in some cases when it is established that the character plays a non-traditional societal role).

If you think I just stated a lot of highly obvious stuff, you’re well enough off to not have to be told as much. But not everyone out there is as well off. Particularly, the radical intersectional feminists who mistakenly view sexualization as a form of objectification. But the fact that they’re wrong isn’t stopping them from passionately trying to become authoritarian moral busybodies.

Intersectional feminists, being absolutely tone-deaf, misses the irony of the fact that, on International Women’s Day, the design change of a cartoon rabbit that isn’t real, and therefore cannot be an actual victim, makes the news by becoming less feminine. While this is occurring, women in the middle-east have almost no rights to speak of compared to men, and are legally kept in harems as sexual slaves.

Priorities, much?

As one might imagine, the furry community is furious about this news. They’ve become yet another western creative community that has become negatively impacted by intersectionalism’s obsession with making everything it touches less entertaining. They’re a sorta-dubious addition to the club, but they’re an addition to the club, non-the-less.

You know whose cartoon bunnies remain unaffected by western censorship? Anime.

Today has shown us yet more reason why more and more westerners are turning towards Japanese manga and anime. One can really hand it to the Japanese for making sure that entertainment is still entertaining.

If you’re siding with intersectional feminism and have managed to stick around this far, please stand by for a send-off from Akira Kogami:

When western entertainment fails hard, along comes anime to sweep up yet more viewers. How long will it take for Hollywood et al. to figure out the obvious? I don’t know, but there’s a continual flow of new anime to watch in the time it takes for it to happen.

ILCA, the Developers of the Upcoming Pokémon D&P Remakes, Made a Miku AR App

You may have already heard of ILCA, the company collaborating with GameFreak to make the upcoming Pokémon remakes, Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl. The artistic direction of these games, still in development, has gotten to be rather controversial in the Pokémon community.

Understandably.

You may have already been aware that the company was involved with some big-name games, such as Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, and Dragon Quest XI.

But what you might not be aware of is that ILCA is the company behind an AR (Augmented Reality) app that was part of a collab between Hatsune Miku and Domino’s Pizza in Japan.

If you’ve never heard of Hatsune Miku, welcome to current year, things must have been pretty dull beneath that rock. But if the name is unfamiliar, there’s a strong likelihood you’ll have at least seen the character herself in the back of Suncoast or wherever. She looks like this:

As part of the promotion, Domino’s Pizza produced a special pizza box in Japan. This box, when scanned by the app, would reveal a 3D model of Miku, who would then proceed to sing and dance.

Miku is no stranger to Pokémon, as she had previously been involved in a collab with the media franchise, as shown in the following promotional material:

Here’s the advert of the Domino’s promotion, as presented by none other than the president of Domino’s, himself. I don’t suggest skipping over this one if you haven’t watched it already, as it’s one of the most hilarious and cringe-inducing things out there:

You know what? That app is a marvel of technology. Now that I’ve seen what ILCA can do, I think they deserve a chance with the D&P remakes.

It’s clear that these guys are brilliant.

Do the Upcoming Pokémon D&P Remakes Spoil a Future Nendoroid Line?

Considering that our freedoms are being screwed over along with whatever solutions that could make things any better, I’ve been dwelling on the graphical style of the upcoming Pokémon remakes quite a bit.

But after a while, I came to notice that the overworld models in Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl look kinda reminiscent of something: Nendoroids.

If you’re wondering what a Nendoroid is, it’s a figurine line that originated in Japan. It’s basically like Funcopops, except Nendoroids make Funcopops look like smoldering crap. They are massively more expressive, and usually come with accessories like faceplates and exchangeable limbs for posing.

Here’s an example:

There are already Nendoroid figures of Pokémon trainers, such as this familiar character:

Even the champion from Diamond and Pearl, Cynthia, has been featured:

Could it be that the upcoming D&P remakes are providing strong hints of an upcoming line of Nendoroids? If so, perhaps ILCA are brilliant marketers, after all.

GameFreak must be well aware that most of the revenue that the Pokémon IP generates comes from merchandise. By making a game’s characters look like the merchandise, the interesting aspects of the franchise are being integrated in an intelligent way.

What a brilliant move.

The Pokémon DP Remake Art Style Needs to Improve

When I first saw the art style for the upcoming Pokémon games, Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl, I was warm to it. But since then, the artistic direction hasn’t been sitting well with me.

If you’re wondering what I mean, check out the character model in this picture:

I think that would look awesome on a keychain (Etsy artists, you’re probably well ahead of me). But for a core Pokémon title released in the year 2021? It kinda seems like the Nintendo Switch isn’t being pushed to its limits.

I know that GameFreak could do better. But this time, it wasn’t them. The company has delegated work on the D&P remakes to ILCA, which is short for I Love Computer Art.

Among their accomplishments include Metal Gear Rising: Revengence:

Yakuza 0:

Dragon Quest XI:

NieR: Sutomata:

Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown:

And now Pokémon: Brilliant Chibi and Shining Smol:

They may “love computer art”, but it’s plain to see when they’re not putting their hearts into it. Unless you can look at this battle scene and really think this is current gen:

So, who gets the blame: GameFreak or ILCA?

The answer is both. Whether it’s GameFreak for delegating work on their most beloved IP or ILCA for not taking it seriously, both are at fault for apparently not caring much, in spite of the fact that the games in question are ones that gamers have wanted to see for years.

Looking at the art for the D&P remakes, it’s obvious what little more could be done to make the games presentable: outlines and cel shading. And Pokémon fans are well ahead of the game in providing examples:

Just the outlines alone would do it. But check out what cel shading could do for, you know, an anime-style game:

And as if that weren’t enough, here’s more simple outlining at work:

Oh, hold on… That screen was from a Pokémon game released back in 2013. My mistake.

Still, they’re excellent examples of what you can do when you actually love computer art.

On top of the lazy look, there’s the fact that the remakes are made out to be faithful to the originals. Depending on how true that is, there might not be much point to them. After all, we already have the original Diamond and Pearl games. Other Pokémon remakes justified their existences with the presence of additional content, and it would be sensible if the D&P remakes did the same.

Comparisons have already been made between the D&P remakes and the recent Link’s Awakening remake for Switch. While a nostalgia trip could potentially justify that game’s purchase, the original is already available to play on 3DS. There didn’t seem like there was much new to it to justify the $60 tag when money was tight, so I didn’t purchase it.

That brings up a question that’s likely making more than a few Pokémon hardcores a bit uncomfortable: “Do I really need either of the upcoming Diamond or Pearl remakes as part of the core experience?”

This isn’t just a spin-off we’re talking about here, it’s a core installment for the single highest-grossing intellectual property of all time. If GameFreak wanted to, they could produce a polygon-pusher of immense scale. It’s hard to imagine that budget would be a limiting factor, especially considering that they work with Nintendo, a company that’s so rich that they could finance their own projects without turning to a lender.

But instead, they outsource their big game to a different company, and accept their half-baked effort to present to the world as part of their big presentation. Those don’t seem like the actions of a company that strongly cares.

Don’t worry, I didn’t forget about Pokémon Legends: Arceus. That’s evidence that GameFreak is capable of making a great-looking game. It’s obvious that that’s the one that GameFreak was more passionate about.

Whether it’s GameFreak or ILCA, it’s obvious that they can do better.