Ladder logic provides the solution to objectionable art

Waterhouse_Hylas_and_the_Nymphs_Manchester_Art_Gallery_1896.15

In the last few days, a #MeToo campaigner complained to an art exhibit to have a work removed because the person was triggered by it. Shortly afterwards, the work was reinstated after public outcry. The work in question was the one pictured above, a Victorian era painting titled Hylas and the Nymphs.

Great work guys, you censored a work of art from over a century ago that took inspiration from a fable thousands of years old just to satisfy a blowhard belonging to a fad movement.

If you want feminism to be taken seriously, don’t pull stunts like this. There’s way too much potential for them to backfire, and the result is that people become ashamed to identify as feminists, as indicated nicely by this note left for the curator:

feminist note to curator

If you spend time looking at art, you’re bound to find something that’s objectionable to you. If you don’t want to look at something that you find objectionable, your solution is a simple process: If you don’t like it, don’t look at it.

If this process confuses you, I’ve provided a simple ladder logic program to assist you:

ladder logic objectionable art

Here is a short explanation of how it works:

First Rung: If “You like it” is true, then “You look at it for as long as you like”.
Second Rung: If “You like it” is false, then “You stop looking at it”.

If you don’t know how ladder logic works, here is a tutorial. There you go. You just learned ladder logic, and it became immediately relevant in your life. You’re welcome.

That’s about as simple as I can make it. If you don’t get it, then you shouldn’t have been able to operate an automobile all the way to an art exhibit without causing an accident. Learn to drive. And while you’re at it, stop assuming that every artistic expression of nudity and sexuality somehow demeans women. Nudity is the natural state of the human body, and is not inherently evil. Sexuality is one of the most human traits, and is a universal part of the human experience. An expression of either one doesn’t devalue women. Or anyone, for that matter.

And if, after considering all this, you still don’t like a work of art, just don’t look at it. I doubt that you fill the Pictures directory of your computer with images you don’t like, so why go out of your way to personally view a piece that only makes you upset? Just move on. Calling yourself a feminist doesn’t give you permission to decide for everyone else what art they have access to. Stop assuming that the rest of us can’t handle what we see.

Feminists have a very negative view of the general population, and this is what guides their attempts to decide for us what media that we have access to. Museum goers did a good job of not letting them. Very well done, keep it up.

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