Gap’s Unintentional Right-Wing Message

Gap posted a tweet calling for unity amidst a divisive election. As part of this statement, Gap posted an image of a red and blue sweatshirt.

But then, under pressure from the Twitter mob, Gap took down the tweet. It seems like the Twitterati weren’t as interested in unity as Gap might have hoped.

You might notice something about the tweets that responded:

“I don’t think a zipped hoodie is going to cut it when everyone is this tired, broke, and scared,”

patient9five7 on Twitter

While there are broke people everywhere, leftists tend to be more outspoken about it.

“Sorry I’m not zipping myself to people who don’t believe I’m deserving of basic human rights,”

Allie_F on Twitter

Another common left-wing sentiment is that the right doesn’t believe certain people deserving of basic human rights, though this sentiment is born out of a mischaracterization of right-wing ideals.

Interestingly, the Twitter users who were the most outspoken about inequality between races and classes are the ones that seem the least interested in a message about unity.

Having spent plenty of time among right-wingers, I consider it safe to say that they’re not racist or classist, and what’s more, they are not characterized by divisiveness regarding race or class.

In fact, based on my observations, the right can largely be characterized by a desire to hold an open dialogue in a free-speech environment.

Rather than fighting, the right would prefer to take it easy. They’d be the ones who want to hang out, drink beer, and talk about things. You know, like normal people. But that’s hard to do when the other side is plugging up their ears and hurling the nastiest insults that someone else can imagine for them.

The right wants dialogue, and the left wants to shut down any discussion that isn’t their talking points. When the left shot down Gap’s call for unity, that really illustrated it well.

When only one side listens, only one side learns.

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